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Crown prosecutor

Crown prosecutors make sure decisions to bring people to court are fair and likely to succeed.
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What does a crown prosecutor do?

Crown prosecutors advise the police on matters relating to criminal cases. Then they consider if there’s enough evidence and public interest for a prosecution.

You work in a team with other prosecutors, caseworkers and administrative staff. Your work would include:

  • checking facts and documents for each case
  • considering if there’s enough evidence to convict
  • advising which charges are suitable
  • explaining decisions to defence lawyers, witnesses, the police and other agencies
  • deciding if evidence is reliable and can be used in court
  • preparing the case for the prosecution
  • making sure all relevant evidence is put before the court
  • presenting the case to a panel of magistrates or judges, or to a judge and jury, depending on the court
  • questioning the defendant and witnesses if the defendant denies the offence
  • summing up the case for the prosecution
  • taking part in the development and training of other prosecutors and caseworkers
  • representing the CPS at casework conferences

You begin as a crown prosecutor, progressing to senior crown prosecutor as you gain experience and successfully complete training.


What do I need to do to become a crown prosecutor?

You can apply directly for a crown prosecutor post in the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) if you’re a qualified solicitor or barrister. You must have completed your Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) and a two-year training contract or a 12-month pupillage.

Check the solicitor and barrister job profiles for full details of how to qualify for these careers.


Related skills

  • Analytics
  • Attention to detail
  • Communication
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Organisation
  • Patience
  • Problem solving
  • Time management

Essential qualifications

  • Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) and a two-year training contract or a 12-month pupillage.

Where to find out more


Where could I be working?

Most of the cases you work on would be handled in magistrates' courts. On more serious cases you would work in the Crown Court. 

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