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Physiotherapist

Physiotherapists work with patients to improve their range of movement and promote wellbeing.
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What does a physiotherapist do?

This role might involve helping patients with spine and joint problems, especially after an operation; helping patients recovering from accidents, sports injuries and strokes; working with children who have mental or physical disabilities; and helping older people with physical problems become more mobile.

Physiotherapists work in various areas and departments, such as paediatrics, outpatients, intensive care, women's health and occupational health. They use a variety of treatments and techniques, including:

  • physical manipulation
  • massage
  • therapeutic exercise
  • electrotherapy
  • ultrasound
  • acupuncture
  • hydrotherapy

 


What do I need to do to become a physiotherapist?

You will need to have an interest in human anatomy and physiology, plus patience and sensitivity. You must also be interested in the health and wellbeing of patients.​ 

To become a chartered physiotherapist you need a physiotherapy degree or postgraduate award approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). This will make you eligible for state registration and membership of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP). 


Related skills

  • Communication
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Organisation
  • Patience
  • Teamwork

Academic route

  • Five GCSEs (A-C), including maths, English and a science subject
  • Three A levels, including a biological science (PE may be accepted by some universities)

Essential qualifications

  • A physiotherapy degree or postgraduate award approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Where to find out more


Where could I be working?

You will find most jobs in the NHS. However, you could also work with local authorities and in the private sector, at day centres, schools, hospices, care homes, fitness centres and sports clinics, for example. 


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